-Respectfully, Dean. More than a year later when i read this post (November 2019), you brought the words back into perspective without "McDojo" jibes. a) Do you study a Japanese style of karate (rather than an Okinawan style of karate)? in Japan. OKAGE SAMADE. I was one of the founders of a MA club at my CUNY college back in NYC in '80, and we used it in our club, but NONE of my traditional Japanese Martial Art instructors used it, nor did my traditional Chinese Martial Instructors ever use it. after every pushup either. Sure, but if that's the culture of your style, then I think it's acceptable. I knew it existed but it had never entered my ears other than an occasional 80's B rated Karate flick. Totally agree, Whether or not the word originated in Okinawa is irrelevant to the vast majority of people who use it. I have been to dojo's in Japan where it is used, and some where it isn't used (Just like the US). http://www.bbat50.com/2009/10/words-we-useour-gangwords.html, Hi Jesse, Love this article, not in the last place because of the reactions! And every dojo learns it different. In brazil, at least in traditional Karate, we use osu as a demonstration Of respect, in the beginning and end Of the training. the body is trained by training the mind. What I noticed, right off, were the use of traditional greetings and thank yous, etc. I probably wouldn't dare to say this to anyone in person, and especially not to a master. Due to my parents divorce, I got to fly back and forth a bit during those years, and no one that I trained with in California ever used it, ever, but ALL of my friends back in NYC used it back. Language is a fluent thing, words are adopted from other languages and can change meaning. Greetings Jesse! Osae means "to press" and shinobu means "patience" or "steady spirit". The use in the Japanese Subs were due to cramped quarters and officers were constantly rubbing shoulders with enlisted so the use of OSU which is a contraction showing seniority of the officer to the others. Thanks for the info. The funny part is, when I was writing you the message, I wanted to write at the end of the message and I knew it's written differently than I remember so I searched on Google, keep in mind I didn't search, your name or anything, just Osu karate and this post was the first, I didn't even check the link, just clicked it, I was surprised when I saw your face on the right and after that I realized it's your website. My primary dojo say Osu a bit (ie after the rei's - except to shomen and sometimes to indicate "I understand" / "Understand?". I know we all did. I noticed that a lot of University Dojos tend to use "Osu"... And we have always been "When in Rome" when at a Dojo that uses it. I practice Itosu-ryu and we never use osu inside the dojo. Thanks for bringing it up to my attention, though. I think for her it lost the meaning. Meaning of OSU ! Also when greeting the sensei, when bowing after the short sit-down meditation, before class. Nice to get some egdeamacation, and 'yes' i get it! Thank you for the post. I did once hear Kanazawa sensei say once it after a seminar, (sounded like "hoss") to the whole of our group in attendance, and I got the distinct impression he was being accommodating of our local tendency and going with the flow. The verb ‘osu’ which means “push”, and ‘shinobu’ which means “to endure”. I have little time for cultural elitism or for offense that is taken when clearly not given. In 1994 the head of the International BJJ Federation, Carlos Gracie Jr, was touring Australia to introduce the art with Marcio Feitosa and Roberto 'Gordo' Correa. to greet me. What does a clumsy karateka say? Kyokushin didn't invent it, Kyokushin just made it popular and turned it into a catch all term. I started googling for OSS usage one a acquaintance of mine told me that I was using OSS wrongly. Keep up the good job! I'm just basically explaining that maybe the reason for the proliferation of Osu isn't just a Western thing. Not suitable for 'polite company'. OSU We never used the term too much in California, but when I went back East, it seems to have EXPLODED and been thrown at least ten times into every sentence. Luv your stuff. This feeling of respect is OSU! At my old dojo we used "Osu" for everything: "kiai," greeting, acknowledgement, bowing, and so on.